Week Fifteen

***COMING SOON***
***SPRING 2019*** THIS PAGE HAS NOT BEEN UPDATED FOR FALL YET***

Evil Toddler Meme

We’ve almost made it to the end of the course, creators! I’ve chosen the Evil Kid meme (click on the image for a history of this meme) for a reason: the creative process never ends if you continue to create stories. See the chart below from the beginning of the course.

Map to Digital Storytelling

You probably won’t blog about each step every time you create (although you might).

  • You will, however, most likely (consciously or unconsciously) read examples of digital stories and think about the literary elements used.
  • You will then evaluate which of those stories are good based on criteria of your choosing.
  • You will be ready to create another digital story at some point during this process.
  • Lastly, you’ll reflect and tweak your creative process to work for you and contemplate the development of your understanding of the various genres of digital storytelling.

Genres are simply the set of expectations for a type of story. For instance, you expect a different experience from reading a Twitter story than you do playing a visual novel.

You might not follow this order but will probably bounce back and forth between these steps until you are motivated to create something new because it’s okay to break the rules when being creative. That goes for the rules of the genre and the rules of this creative process.

For this week:

  1. Upload the final draft of your creative digital story after revising based on the feedback from your peers and my feedback (which I will get to you tonight, I’m running a little behind).
  2. Post a reflection journal to Blackboard (150 word minimum). You will reflect on what you learned about the various genres of digital stories and/or your creative process. I’ve set up the space in Blackboard in case you don’t want to make this part of the process public. But you are more than welcome to just post a link to your blog entry to that journal.
  3. Vote on your favorites from our list of digital stories.

The deets for each step are below:

 


1. Post a link to Blackboard of the final draft of your creative digital story which you revised based on the feedback from your peers and my feedback (which I will get to you tonight, I’m running a little behind).


2. Post a reflection journal to Blackboard (150 word minimum). You will reflect on what you learned about the various genres of digital stories and/or your creative process. I’ve set up the space in Blackboard in case you don’t want to make this part of the process public. But you are more than welcome to just post a link to your blog entry to that journal.


3. Vote on your favorites from our list of digital stories below. You have three “Pinny points” to spend. You can spend them all on one story or spread them across two or three stories. You can even use a point to add a story to our list! Future students will be able to see the total votes for each story when viewing this list. And it might help them in choosing a story to listen to/read/watch/or play.

This is a list of the digital stories I found most interesting while reading Bryan Alexander’s book.

Blog Stories (fiction)

She’s a flight risk (2003)
The Sick Land (2013)

Blog Stories (CreepyPasta)

Slender Man
The Dionaea House

Blog Stories (nonfiction)

WWI: Experience of an English Soldier
The Orwell Diaries
World War II Today
Small Town Noir

Blog Stories (wikis)

SCP Foundation

Microblog Fiction (Twitter)

War of the Worlds
Zombie Attack

Microblog Fiction (Facebook)

Henio Zytomirsky
9 Scientists
Darklyng

Visual Stories

Farm to Food
Gender Miseducation
The Chase
lonelygirl15

Interactive Stories & Hypermedia

Adventure (1975)
Ted’s Caving Journal
Dreaming Method Project (1993-)
The Jew’s Daughter
Lexia to Perplexia
GRAMMATRON

Audio Stories

Serial
Memory Palace
Welcome to Nightvale
The Deep Vault
Unresolved

Keep Calm and Keep Writing

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