Week Three

Now it's time for full-sized blogs!

Here are the steps:

No podcast or quiz for this week
1. Review page 62-68 in the book if needed.
2. Find and read one full-sized blog mentioned in chapter four.
3. Post an informal microblog about that story answering the following question:

How does one literary feature from The Literary Web for Theorists 
enhance the story? Make sure to choose a different literary feature than you used in your first microblog. Also, make sure you are defining that literary term in your own words so your readers can follow along. Lastly, try to incorporate what Bryan Alexander writes about blogs in your microblog (either through paraphrase or direct quote). Write at least 100 words.

4. Comment on at least two of your fellow creators’ blogs.


1. Review page 62-68 in the book if needed. No quiz this week.

The New Digital Storytelling, Revised Edition


2. Find and read one full-sized blog mentioned in chapter four (links in back of book or the list)

List of interesting digital stories from Alexander


3. Post an informal microblog about that full-sized blog answering the following question:

How does one literary feature from The Literary Web for Theorists enhance the story? Make sure to choose a different literary feature than you used in your first microblog. Also, make sure you are defining that literary term in your own words so your readers can follow along. Lastly, try to incorporate what Bryan Alexander writes about blogs in your microblog (either through paraphrase or direct quote).

The following definitions are from Introduction to College Writing at CNM

Paraphrasing Sources

When you paraphrase material from a source, restate the information from an entire sentence or passage in your own words, using your own original sentence structure. A paraphrased source differs from a summarized source in that you focus on restating the ideas, not condensing them.

Again, it is important to check your paraphrase against the source material to make sure it is both accurate and original. Inexperienced writers sometimes use the thesaurus method of paraphrasing—that is, they simply rewrite the source material, replacing most of the words with synonyms. This constitutes a misuse of sources, and copying sentence structure, or syntax, is also a form of academic dishonesty. A true paraphrase restates ideas using the writer’s own language and style.

Quoting Sources Directly

Most of the time, you will summarize or paraphrase source material instead of quoting directly. Doing so shows that you understand your research well enough to write about it confidently in your own words. However, direct quotes can be powerful when used sparingly and with purpose.

Quoting directly can sometimes help you make a point in a colorful way. If an author’s words are especially vivid, memorable, or well phrased, quoting them may help hold your reader’s interest. Direct quotations from an interviewee or an eyewitness may help you personalize an issue for readers. And when you analyze primary sources, such as a historical speech or a work of literature, quoting extensively is often necessary to illustrate your points. These are valid reasons to use quotations.

Less experienced writers, however, sometimes overuse direct quotations in a research paper because it seems easier than paraphrasing. At best, this reduces the effectiveness of the quotations. At worst, it results in a paper that seems haphazardly pasted together from outside sources. Use quotations sparingly for greater impact.

When you do choose to quote directly from a source, follow these guidelines:

  • Make sure you have transcribed the original statement accurately.

  • Represent the author’s ideas honestly. Quote enough of the original text to reflect the author’s point accurately.

  • Never use a stand-alone quotation. Always integrate the quoted material into your own sentence by creating a signal phrase.

  • Use ellipses (…) if you need to omit a word or phrase. Use brackets [ ] if you need to replace a word or phrase.

  • Make sure any omissions or changed words do not alter the meaning of the original text. Omit or replace words only when absolutely necessary to shorten the text or to make it grammatically correct within your sentence.

  • Write away from the quote. Create an original sentence following the quote that introduces the connection you are making between your argument and the quoted material.

  • Include correctly formatted citations that follow the assigned style guide.

If you get writer’s block, check out https://mytext.cnm.edu/lesson/drafting-strategies/.


4. Comment on at least two other blogs to get the conversation started!

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