Curriculum Vitae

Brian K. Hudson | 505.312.3123 | bhudson11@cnm.edu
445 Sycamore St. NE
Albuquerque, NM 87106

Education

Ph.D., University of Oklahoma: Literary and Cultural Studies 2015

Dissertation: “First Beings: Relationships with Nonhuman Animals in Native American Literatures.”

My dissertation examines the relationships between humans and other animals in selected Native American literary texts and expands common understandings of indigeneity. Building on the work of Native theorists Linda Hogan and John Mohawk on oral traditions, I claim that we share indigeneity with animals and formulate an Indigenous model for understanding human interactions with other animals. To do this, I analyze selected Native texts that range from the earliest Indian evocations—creation narratives—to contemporary prose in the newly-treated genre of Indigenous science fiction. Through readings of exemplary Native texts such as John Milton Oskison’s Brothers Three (1935) and D’Arcy McNickle’s The Surrounded (1936), I argue that American colonialism has and continues to adversely affect relationships between humans and animals. I further apply this broader conceptualization of indigeneity to Native political philosophy to examine the subsequent implications of recognizing the sovereignty of other species.

M.A., University of Oklahoma: Literary and Cultural Studies

2009

B.A., Northeastern State University: English

2006

A.A., Tulsa Community College: Liberal Arts

2001






Professional Experience
Regular Full-Time Instructor of English 2016-Present
Central New Mexico Community College

I teach both College Writing and Analytic Writing at CNM, which is the largest associate degree- granting institution in the U.S. for Native American students. I am currently developing an online version of my College Writing course that utilizes creative nonfiction pedagogy and is focused thematically on digital humanities. My Analytic Writing course is focused on various types of texts about the future, including literary texts (short story, short film, and machinima) in the genre of Indigenous science fiction.

John E. Sawyer Alternative Futurisms Postdoctoral Fellow 2015-2016
University of California at Riverside

Alternative Futurisms” was a year-long John E. Sawyer seminar, sponsored by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which brought together scholars, writers, and artists to work on the intersections between ethnic identities and futuristic speculation. The main purpose of “Alternative Futurisms” was to create a dialogue about diverse ethnic futures and to explore the power of speculative fiction as a tool for social change.

Peer-Reviewed Publications

Domesticated Species in D’Arcy McNickle’s The Surrounded and John M. Oskison’s Brothers Three.” Studies in American Indian Literatures, vol. 28, no. 2, 2016, pp. 80-108.

A Seat at the Table: Political Representation for Animals.” The Routledge Companion to Native American Literature. Routledge, 2015, pp. 229-237.

Foreword. From the Extinct Volcano, A Bird of Paradise, by Carter Revard. Mongrel Empire Press, 2014, pp. i-ii.

First Beings in American Indian Literatures.” Animal Studies: Special Issue, Studies in American Indian Literatures, vol. 25, no. 4, 2013, pp. 3-10.

Visible Rhythm and Yeatsian Noh: Japanese Buddhist Poetics in ‘At the Hawk’s Well’.” Siar: The Journal of the Western Institute of Irish Studies, vol. 3, no.1, 2009, pp. 37-49.

Edited Works

Editor. From the Extinct Volcano, A Bird of Paradise by Carter Revard. Mongrel Empire Press, 2014.

Co-editor. Animal Studies: Special Issue of Studies in American Indian Literatures, vol. 24, no. 4, 2013.

Book Reviews

Review of Art as Performance, Story as Criticism: Reflections on Native Literary Aesthetics, by Craig Womack. Crosstimbers: A Multicultural, Interdisciplinary Journal, vol. 10, no.2, 2010, pp. 26-27.

Creative Works

Land Run on Sooner City.” mitewacimowina: Indigenous Science Fiction & Speculative Storytelling. Theytus Books, 2017, pp. 233-253.

Digital Medicine.” People of Color Destroy Science Fiction: Special Issue of Lightspeed, 2016, pp. 43-59.

I’m Not That Indian.” Yellow Medicine Review: A Journal of Indigenous Literature, Art, Thought. McNaughton & Gunn, 2013, p. 15.

Areas of Interest

Native American literatures and theory

Cherokee literature, language, and culture

Animal Studies

American Literatures

Science Fiction

Invited Speaker

If Sequoyah Was a Cyberpunk.” 2nd Annual Symposium on the Future Imaginary. Kelowna, BC, August 2016.

Nonhuman Sovereignty and Cherokee Politics.” BiopoliticsGeopolitics – Sovereignty – Life: Settler Colonialisms and Indigenous Presences in North America. Mainz, Germany, June 2015.

Other Conference Presentations

Participant. “Panel on Indigenous Cyberpunk with Misha and Brian K. Hudson.” Sawyer Seminar Series on Alternative Futurisms. Riverside, CA, June 2016.

Digital Medicine.” The Red Earth MFA Red Dirt Offsite Reading. Los Angeles, April 2016.

Moderator. “Panel Discussion on Editing Science Fiction and Fantasy.” Sawyer Seminar Series on Alternative Futurisms. Riverside, CA, January 2016.

Participant. “Panel Discussion on Indigenous Science and SF.” Revising the Past, Remaking the Future. Riverside, CA, October 2015.

Moderator. “Panel Discussion on Settler Colonial Theory and Speculative Fiction.” Sawyer Seminar Series on Alternative Futurisms. Riverside, CA, October 2015.

A Theory of First Beings.” Native American and Indigenous Studies Association. Austin, May 2014.

First Beings as Domesticated Species.” Native American Literature Symposium. Minneapolis, March 2014.

The Future of First Beings.” Southwest/Texas Popular Culture & American Culture Association. Albuquerque, February 2013.

Are You Ready For Some Roller Derby?” Student Association of Graduate English Studies. Norman, January 2013.

Osage Posthumanism and Daniel H. Wilson’s Robopocalypse.” Modern Language Association. Boston, January 2013.

Interspecies Activism in William Sanders’ ‘At Ten Wolf Lake’.” Native American Literature Symposium. Albuquerque, March 2012.

Land Run on Sooner City.” Southwest/Texas Popular Culture & American Culture Association. Albuquerque, February 2012.

Land Run on Sooner City.” Ninth Native American Symposium and Film Festival. Durant, November 2011.

Teaching the Savages to Write or Reasoning Together (And With Our Students): A Polemic.” Student Association of Graduate English Studies. Norman, October 2011.

Utopian Identity in the Speculative Fiction of William Sanders.” Joint Conference of the National Popular Culture & American Culture Association and the Southwest/Texas Popular Culture & American Culture Association. San Antonio, April 2011.

Linda Hogan and the Study of First Beings.” Native American Literature Symposium. Albuquerque, March 2011.

Companion Species in Momaday’s The Ancient Child.” Native American Literature Symposium. Albuquerque, March 2010.

The Question of the Animal in Relation to Shaw’s ‘Heartbreak House’.” International Shaw Society. Washington, D.C., October 2009.

Dogland and Dickens’s ‘Two Dog-Shows’.” Animals and Society. NSW, Australia, July 2009.

Animal Empathy in Gladys Cardiff’s ‘Last Days at Petland on Aurora Avenue’.” Native American and Indigenous Studies Association. Minneapolis, May 2009.

Squeamishness in Twain’s A Dog’s Tale.” Nineteenth-Century Studies Association. Milwaukee, March 2009.

Emptiness and Yeatsian Noh: Japanese Buddhist Poetics in ‘At the Hawk’s Well’.” American Conference for Irish Studies West. Albuquerque, October 2008.

An Irish View of American Mythic Tradition: Campbell, Kearny, and Doyle.” Southwest/Texas Popular Culture & American Culture Association. Albuquerque, February 2007.

Teaching Experience Central New Mexico Community College

College Writing 2016-present

In this first-year writing course, students use techniques based on creative nonfiction and rhetoric to interrogate their relationships to digital technologies. They further evaluate specific issues that have arisen with the proliferation of digital technology and explore discourse communities in which digital technology is an important component. This theme allows students to connect several types of essayspersonal, argumentative, and researchthrough a meaningful and timely topic.

Analytic Writing 2016-present

In this first-year writing course, students learn and practice analyzing several types of texts, including commercials, songs, political speeches, and works of fiction. Through focusing on how these texts make arguments about the future, the students practice Toulmin argumentation and learn about the genres of Indigenous futurism and Chicana/o futurism through film and literature. My students in the fall 2016 semester had the opportunity to do a live interview with a Mohawk director of machinima (animation created using video-game environments).

Teaching Experience University of Oklahoma

Principles of English Composition II2008-2015 (13 sections)

In this 1000-level required course, students composed arguments based on Toulmin argumentation with themes concerning “Hyphenated-Identity” (identity constructed from many discursive sources: ethnic, pop cultural, etc.) and “Unconventional-isms” (less apparent forms of discrimination such as speciesism, ableism, etc.), among other themes.

Principles of English Composition I—2007-2015 (8 sections)

In this 1000-level required course, students composed essays in four genres informed by rhetoric and discourse theories. We started with literacy narratives based on students’ experiences with language. We moved to analyses of “discourse communities” chosen by the students. Students then constructed thesis-driven essays from readings in the field of composition and rhetoric. Lastly, they constructed visual persuasive arguments (memes) and analyzed their effectiveness through social media.

Animal Studies: Our Complex Relationships with Other Animals—2013

In this lecture series for the Lifelong Learning Institute, we explored animal studies. The field of animal studies is broadly defined as an inquiry into how humans maintain our many complex relationships with other animals. The lectures surveyed nonhuman animals in philosophy, poststructuralist theory, and Native American theory.

Futuristic Indians—2012

In this 3000-level cultural studies course, we surveyed new works of science fiction written by Native American writers, along with relevant artwork and short films. We discussed how Indigenous science fiction uses generic conventions of science fiction to explore Native issues and concerns.

Race and Roller Derby—2012

In this 3000-level cultural studies course, we explored the cultural phenomenon of roller derby through the lens of critical race theory. We engaged derby narratives in the form of memoirs, movies, documentaries, comics, young adult fiction, and a personal interview with a player using questions written by the students.

Roller Derby!—2011 (2 sections)

In this 3000-level cultural studies course, we explored the cultural phenomenon of roller derby through the lens of feminist sports studies. We engaged derby narratives in the form of memoirs, movies, documentaries, comics, young adult fiction, and a personal interview with a player using questions written by the students.

Disney Dogs and Popular Pets—2010-2011 (6 sections)

In this 3000-level cultural studies course, we explored how animals, more specifically dogs, have been portrayed in popular culture through short stories and films. We engaged recent theories on the representation of nonhuman animals and how they relate to activism and advocacy.

Human Animal Studies: Trans Specific Theory and Practice—2008

In this 2000-level cultural studies course, we looked at how the categories of animal and human are constructed and the social and ethical implications of that construction. We discussed how both cutting-edge philosophy and new scientific studies have blurred the line between what animals and humans are perceived to be.

Teaching Experience — Northeastern State University

Freshman Composition II—2007

In this 1000-level required course, students moved through the process of researching a topic, assessing sources, and synthesizing information into a thesis-driven research paper.

NSUBA Writing Center—2006-2007

In the writing center, we provided tutoring assistance to an interdisciplinary group of students. I helped launch the writing center at the Broken Arrow campus. I created and taught MLA workshops, created a sign-in database, designed and launched the website, documented and implemented procedures, and promoted the center.

Types of Literature (T.A.)—2006

In this 3000-level literature class, students studied several forms of literature and various means of analysis. I assisted Dr. John Mercer with instruction. I prepared and taught lessons, graded essays, gave feedback on student drafts, administered study sessions, and gave one-on-one student writing assistance.

Other Teaching Experience

A+ Tutoring—2007

In this public G.E.D. course, students studied material for their high-school equivalency diplomas.

Service

Editorial board. Mongrel Empire Press. 2013-present.

Reviewer. Transmotion. 2014-present.

Editorial board. (Red): A Journal of Indigenous Literature and Art. 2013-present.

Reviewer. American Indian Culture and Research. 2011-present.

Reviewer. Journal for Critical Animal Studies. 2009-2015.

Co-chair. Native American/Indigenous Studies area of the Southwest/Texas Popular Culture and American Culture Association. 2011-2013.

President. Student Association of Graduate English Studies (SAGES) 2009-2015.

Awards and Scholarships

John E. Sawyer Postdoctoral Fellowship – 2015 ($42,000)

University of Oklahoma Dissertation Fellowship – 2014 ($18,700)

American Indian Graduate Center Scholarship – 2009-2013 ($15,000)

Cherokee Nation Graduate School Scholarship – 2007-2011 ($10,000)

Sequoyah National Research Center Research Fellowship – 2012 ($1,500)

University of Oklahoma Robberson Travel Grant (twice)

University of Oklahoma Second Century Scholarship

University of Oklahoma Puterbaugh Student Fellowship

Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures Emerging Scholars Fellowship

International Shaw Society Travel Grant

Northeastern State University Sigma Tau Delta award

Professional Memberships

Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers and Storytellers. 2012-present.

Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures. 2011-present.

University of Oklahoma Student Association of Graduate English Studies. 2007-2015.

Languages

Proficient in Cherokee and Latin.

Other Skills

Expertise in several computer software applications and programming languages. Extensive experience in website construction, database administration, and Linux scripting.

References

Geary Hobson
Professor of English
University of Oklahoma
760 Van Vleet Oval
Norman, OK 73019-2055
Phone: (405) 325-4661
geary.hobson-1@ou.edu

Vincent Leitch
George Lynn Cross Research Professor
Paul and Carol Daube Sutton Chair in English
University of Oklahoma
760 Van Vleet Oval
Norman, OK 73019-2055
Phone: (405) 325-4661
vbleitch@ou.edu

Joshua Nelson
Assistant Professor of English
University of Oklahoma
760 Van Vleet Oval
Norman, OK 73019-2055
Phone: (405) 325-4661
joshuabnelson@ou.edu

Alan Velie
David Ross Boyd Professor of English
University of Oklahoma
760 Van Vleet Oval
Norman, OK 73019-2055
Phone: (405) 325-4661
alanvelie@ou.edu