Imagery

Sudden Clarify Clarence


“Imagery may be defined as the representation through language of sense experience. Poetry appeals directly to our senses, of course, through its music and rhythms, which we actually hear when it is read aloud. But indirectly it appeals to our senses through imagery, the representation to the imagination of sense experience. The word image perhaps most often suggests a mental picture, something seen in the mind’s eye―and visual imagery is the kind of imagery that occurs most frequently in poetry. But an image may also represent

a sound (auditory imagery);

a smell (olfactory imagery);

a taste (gustatory imagery);

touch, such as hardness, softness, wetness, or heat and cold (tactile imagery);

an internal sensation, such as hunger, thirst, fatigue, or nausea (organic imagery);

or movement or tension in the muscles or joints (kinesthetic imagery).

If we wish to be scientific, we could extend this list further, for psychologists no longer confine themselves to five or even six senses, but for purposes of discussion poetry the preceding classification should ordinarily be sufficient.”

Perrine’s Literature: Structure, Sound, and Sense by Tomas R. Arp and Greg Johnson. 9th Edition.

Sound Imagery Rhythm Diction Main Assertion Sub Assertion(s) Explanation Examples Sub Assertion(s) Explanation Examples Sub Assertion(s) Explanation Examples Sub Assertion(s) Explanation Examples